‘Death Note’ Featurette Explains How The Manga Was Brought To Life

Netflix Death Note
A new behind-the-scenes look at Netflix’s adaptation of Death Note features the cast and crew commenting on their love for the source material and the different direction that they’re taking with the story.

Netflix just released a new featurette from director Adam Wingard and producer Masi Oka explaining how Death Note piqued their interests and what they did to figure out how to approach the source material in a new way, along with input for the actors playing Light, Mia, and L.

Based on the famous Japanese manga written by Tsugumi Ohba and Takeshi Obata, Death Note follows a high school student who comes across a supernatural notebook, realizing it holds within it a great power; if the owner inscribes someone’s name into it while picturing their face, he or she will die. Intoxicated with his new godlike abilities, the young man begins to kill those he deems unworthy of life.

Death Note will leave its mark on August 25, 2017 exclusively through the Netflix streaming service. Its cast includes Nat Wolff as Light Turner, Margaret Qualley as Mia Sutton, Keith Stanfield as L, Paul Nakauchi as Watari, Shea Whigham as James Turner, and Willem Dafoe as the voice of Ryuk. Masi Oka will also appear in an unspecified role.

Source: YouTube

10 Anime Properties Hollywood Should Tackle Next

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American Properties Anime Film
Japan has been a driving force in the world of technology and gaming, but is also known for their animation. Anime series and films have become popular worldwide. Shows like Naruto and DragonBall Z are household names throughout the world. This popularity has carried over and gotten the attention of Hollywood with the occasional dip into these popular properties. The influence of anime is seen throughout Hollywood productions, but most notably in the hit franchise, The Matrix. While it is a challenging endeavor to adapt anime there have been attempts to do so, including Netflix’s Death Note Film as well as the live-action Ghost in the Shell. It’s an interesting time to look over how Hollywood adapts anime and which ones deserve to be given an American treatment.

Here are 10 anime properties that Hollywood should tackle next

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Grant Davis

Grant Davis

A Texan freelance writer with interests in Star Wars, superhero movies, and entertainment in general.