Neil Gaiman’s Latest ‘American Gods’ Gets Motion Poster

American Gods

British author Neil Gaiman’s novel American Gods, which is being adapted by Starz, is being released this April. Starz has begun marketing the show, starting with a motion poster they released today.

American Gods tells the story of a world where Gods are real and their power is determined by the beliefs mortals have towards them; if you believe, they exist. The show will focus on Ian McShane’s character Mr. Wednesday who enlists the aid of Shadow Moon.

The motion poster, revealed via Twitter, showcases two Gods basking in the glory that is classic New York weather, enjoying the storm as it comes. There’s something beautiful, yet equally bleak to the poster. The series will definitely be hitting on Gaiman’s themes of consumerism, modern media and technology, and belief systems. You can check it out below.

American Gods has been translated into over 30 languages and earned numerous accolades including Hugo, Nebula and Bram Stoker Awards for Best Novel. The plot posits a war brewing between old and new gods: the traditional gods of mythological roots from around the world steadily losing believers to an upstart pantheon of gods reflecting society’s modern love of money, technology, media, celebrity and drugs. Its protagonist, Shadow Moon, is an ex-con who becomes bodyguard and traveling partner to Mr. Wednesday, a conman but in reality one of the older gods, on a cross-country mission to gather his forces in preparation to battle the new deities.

The series is being adapted by Bryan Fuller, best known for his work on Hannibal, and Michael Green who recently wrote Blade Runner 2049 and Alien: Covenant.

American Gods stars Ian McShane, Ricky Whittle, Emily Browning, and Crispin Glover.

Thus far, eight episodes have been ordered by Starz. American Gods will hit screens in April 2017 on Starz.

Source: American Gods (via Twitter)

 

Aahil Dayani

Aahil Dayani

Aahil Dayani is a writer and film enthusiast from Toronto, Ontario. When he isn't writing about movies, he pretends to watch them.

  • How many American Gods has Neil Gaiman had, exactly, that this show is the latest one?

    (Yes, I’m criticizing the headline.)