‘IT’ Second-Week Ticket Sales Reach New High For Horror Films On Fandango

ITAfter a record-breaking opening weekend at the box office, director Andy Muschietti’s adaptation of Stephen King’s IT is set to experience more financial success on the film’s second weekend in theaters. The Wrap reports that second-week ticket sales for IT are the best for any horror film on Fandango.

Doubling the second-week tickets sales of the second-best performing horror film Get Out, the outlet reports that IT currently ranks at the top of the Fanticipation chart with the buzz indicator reaching 89 out of 100 points.

Fandango Managing Editor Erik Davis made the following statement of the success of IT:

“‘It’ isn’t clowning around as it continues to attract new fans and repeat viewers. Horror has never been hotter at the box office, especially smart, well-crafted thrillers like ‘It’ that break new ground. We can expect to see ‘It’ remaining a King-size hit for the rest of the month.”

Expected to retain the number one spot at the box office this weekend, IT has already earned $143.6 million in North American theaters and has surpassed the $200 million mark at the worldwide box office.

Will you be purchasing another ticket to see IT or was one viewing of the terrifying film enough? Share your thoughts below!

Based on Stephen King’s best-selling novel. A group of young kids face their biggest fears when they seek answers to the disappearance of children in their hometown of Derry, Maine. They square off against an evil clown named Pennywise, whose history of murder and violence dates back for centuries.

Directed by Andy Muschietti, the film stars Finn Wolfhard, Jaeden Lieberher, Wyatt Olef, Jack Grazer, Jeremy Ray Taylor, Sophia Lillis, Chosen Jacobs, and Bill Skarsgård.

IT is now playing in theaters!

Source: The Wrap

10 Stephen King Adaptations Hollywood Needs To Get Right

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Stephen King ItWith The Dark Tower and It, two of King’s most famous and beloved works, reaching the big screen, it feels like the gates are opening on a new age of Stephen King adaptations

Already we’ve seen 1) a new Carrie movie, 2) Under the Dome and 11/22/63 get TV adaptations 3) Netflix’s upcoming Gerald’s Game, 4) a TV series based on the Mr. Mercedes trilogy, 5) Josh Boone looks to make Revival his follow-up to X-Men: The New Mutants, 5) a new version of Hearts in Atlantis is in the works (just called Hearts) and 6) a Cujo remake, with the amazing title of C.U.J.O. Even Cell got made, plus a personal favorite of mine The Mist is back in the form of a new Syfy series airing later this year (based on both the original novella and Frank Darabont’s superb 2007 film).

Our age of cinematic universes feels tailor-made for the world-renowned author. King is known not only for his productivity but for how his stories interlock together in the same universe (multiverse, if you want to get specific). His entire oeuvre is connected by characters, locations, and events, all centered around the literal and figurative Dark Tower, the structure and book series sit at the center of King’s worlds. Of course, no one entity owns the rights to all of King’s works, so we won’t be seeing, say, Pennywise the Dancing Clown say hi to Idris Elba’s gunslinger in a movie anytime soon, but it speaks to King’s continued relevance.

There are, of course, the adaptations that are sacrosanct and need to no update, plus others where we are simply waiting to see if they happen. Speaking of Darabont, he delivered a trilogy of amazing King adaptations in my opinion between The Shawshank Redemption, The Green Mile, and The Mist. Rob Reiner also mastered the artform, giving us Stand by Me and Misery. There’s already a perfectly-good The Dead Zone movie and TV show. The Tommyknockers and Desperation got the miniseries treatment in 1991 and 2006, respectively. The latter came with a teleplay by King himself, while the former was announced for a new miniseries back in 2013 along with Rosemary’s Baby, the failure of which may have something to do with the radio silence since the announcement. The Shining is actually not one, with King famously disliking the Stanley Kubrick film enough to make a miniseries of his own to “correct” the record (and a Shining prequel is first on our list).

While some works defy or seek re-adaptation, the breadth of the man’s work means there’s plenty of new stuff to mine in the coming years as well. Click Next to learn which to watch out for!

Honorable mentions: The Dark Half, Dolores Claiborne, Apt Pupil, Dreamcatcher

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Sebastian Peris

Sebastian Peris

Canadian film lover, comic book geek, political junkie and board game enthusiast.