‘Maze Runner: The Death Cure’ Trailer Will Arrive With ‘Teen Wolf’ Finale

Maze Runner
Fans of Dylan O’Brien will have a lot to look forward to this Sunday as they get their first look at Maze Runner: The Death Cure alongside the series finale of Teen Wolf.

Teen Wolf has had a pretty strong run on MTV since it began back in 2011, and like many good things, it must now come to an end. And since the same kind of logic applies to the Maze Runner series, it’s only fitting that the send-off to one will take time to prepare the send-off for another:

As it stands, Dylan O’Brien’s injury during filming served as a serious setback for Maze Runner: The Death Cure‘s production, as the film was originally intended to release in February of this year. Thankfully, once production resumed on the film, there weren’t any other significant issues and O’Brien got to film the final chapter of his young adult novel adaptation without any further issues.

Maze Runner: The Death Cure will arrive on January 26, 2018. The film’s cast includes Dylan O’Brien, Kaya Scodelario, Thomas Brodie-Sangster, Dexter Darden, Nathalie Emmanuel, Giancarlo Esposito, Aidan Gillen, Walton Goggins, Ki Hong Lee, Jacob Lofland, Barry Pepper, Will Poulter, Rosa Salazar, and Patricia Clarkson.

Source: Twitter

10 Book-To-Film Adaptations That Succeeded (And 15 That Failed)

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Adaptations
As tomorrow’s big Netflix release, the second go-around at adapting A Series of Unfortunate Events, proves, adaptations of beloved source material are not easy to make.

Books and film, like all arts, have a special relationship. The turn of the century saw a massive increase in adaptations of epic fantasy and science-fiction, particularly for the coveted youth market, thanks mostly to two big franchises – Harry Potter and The Lord of the Rings. Both legitimized fantasy as big-budget spectacle and prestige entertainment, when done with care. Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery and the years since are littered with attempts at replicating the magic of those films, including the original Unfortunate Events movie, which is first up on our list (as an ambitious-but-flawed failure).

Now, in the age of Peak TV, adapting these massive sagas are possible on television too. The Walking Dead and Game of Thrones both kicked open doors to imitators in the same ways Potter and Rings did, in terms of scope and budget. Shows like MTV’s Shannara and Hulu’s upcoming The Handmaid’s Tale, both based on famous books, draw directly from this trend. It’s also given second life to properties that didn’t work as features, such as Unfortunate Events.

For this article, I focused on the biggest in YA and children’s literature, in honor of Unfortunate Events return to screens (I’ll be recapping a “book” aka two episodes a day starting tomorrow morning!), while focusing on the criteria to rank them by. When it comes to judging these stories – some classics, some decidedly not – I kept in mind whether the films a) received a sequel b) made money at the box-office and c) were critically acclaimed.

  • Honorary success mentions: Matilda, James and the Giant Peach, Stardust, The Spiderwick Chronicles, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children
  • Honorary failure mentions: Bridge to TerabithiaCharlotte’s Web, The Host

Click Next to scroll through all the failures and successes.

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Grant Davis

Grant Davis

A Texan freelance writer with interests in Star Wars, superhero movies, and entertainment in general.