X-Men On The Big Screen: The Super-Team’s Films Ranked

X-Men

3. X-Men: Days of Future Past

X-Men

. . . And give us pandering, which is Days of Future Past. Don’t get me wrong; a lot of it is good pandering. But the film was such an active apology tour that it seeped into the story until it was indistinguishable from metafiction. It’s not like they chose Days of Future Past because they planned it; they chose it because time travel is a convenient story loophole to erase bad continuity. The comics do it all the time and it’s the perfect indication of how much superhero franchises are absorbing tropes usually associated with comics. It’s a dangerous move; time travel is a deus ex machina that can threaten to undo any dramatic tension. When it doesn’t work, it can end franchises (looking at you, Terminator Genisys). When it does, you get this film.

You can ding it for its sprawling ensemble, its endless exposition, and Wolverine’s lead role but in my opinion you can’t take away from the film working. Its dramatically-compelling theory of time travel and large amount of fan service act as spackle for the film’s holes, such killing the almost the entire First Class supporting class off screen. Wolverine, in either a brilliant case of dramatic irony or a ignorant case of bad writing, is pretty ineffectual as a protagonist. Like First Class was Magneto’s story, this film is Xavier’s and it’s smart (or just savvy) enough to give Jennifer Lawrence an integral role without being reductive to her character’s independence.

Sam Flynn

Sam Flynn

Sam is a writer and journalist whose passion for pop culture burns with the fire of a thousand suns and at least three LED lamps.