X-Men On The Big Screen: The Super-Team’s Films Ranked

X-Men

2. X-Men: First Class

X-Men

Before Days of Future Past awkwardly acknowledged the changes to the franchise, X-Men: First Class could have been mistaken for a straight up reboot. While X-Men Origins: Wolverine was just careless with continuity, First Class seems to go out of its way to alter what the previous films established as the past; the opening scene repeats the concentration camp scene from the first film but then diverges, almost asking “what if?” If the movie is good enough, problems like these become secondary. Fortunately, X-Men: First Class is very good.

Really good superhero films find things to be about other than superheroes. X-Men: First Class is a Bond film, if Bond were a Nazi-hunting Holocaust survivor with the power of magnetism. Vaughn is such a powerful stylist that he makes more of a proto-Kingsman than an X-Men film, taking full advantage of the period setting and embracing a fun, throwback tone. Michael Fassbender owns as a young, smoldering Byronic hero/super-spy version of Magneto (he and Tom Hiddleston should have a staring contest) with James McAvoy doing a commendable inversion of the monk-like Professor X as a raucous, partying youth.

Sam Flynn

Sam Flynn

Sam is a writer and journalist whose passion for pop culture burns with the fire of a thousand suns and at least three LED lamps.