‘Black Panther’ Technology Was Partly Inspired By ‘Blade Runner’

Marvel Production Deisnger Hannah Beachler has revealed that Black Panther was partly inspired by the original 1982 Blade Runner.

When Marvel’s Black Panther hits theaters in February of next year, we will finally be properly introduced to the high-tech, futuristic world of the African nation of Wakanda. The film’s production designer, Hannah Beachler, has revealed that the technology and the world was partly-inspired by another futuristic sci-fi film: Ridley Scott’s classic 1982 film, Blade Runner.

When asked by a fan if Blade Runner inspired the look or feel of Wakanda in the film at all, Beachler replied in the affirmative:

Beachler further elaborated on how Scott’s film inspired the technology and the world of Black Panther, stating:

Beachler also recently spoke with The Frame about her thoughts when designing the world of Wakanda, stating:

“For me, it was always understanding that Wakanda had been there for 10,000 years and then what does it look like now? It was supposed to be a place that was never colonized too, so what does that look like?”

Directed by Ryan Coogler, the film stars Chadwick Boseman as T’Challa/Black Panther, Michael B. Jordan as Erik Killmonger, Lupita Nyong’o as Nakia, Danai Gurira as Okoye, Martin Freeman as Everett K. Ross, Daniel Kaluuya as W’Kabi, Angela Bassett as Ramonda, Letitia Wright as Shuri, Forest Whitaker as Zuri, Winston Duke as M’Baku, Florence Kasumba as Ayo, Sterling K. Brown as N’Jobu, Andy Serkis as Ulysses Klaue and John Kani as King T’Chaka.

Black Panther follows T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman) who, after the events of Captain America: Civil War, returns home to the isolated, technologically advanced African nation of Wakanda to take his place as King. However, when an old enemy reappears on the radar, T’Challa’s mettle as King and Black Panther is tested when he is drawn into a conflict that puts the entire fate of Wakanda and the world at risk.

Marvel’s Black Panther hits theaters on February 16, 2018.

Source: Twitter; The Frame