‘Dune’ Reboot Taps ‘Forrest Gump’ Writer Eric Roth To Pen Script

Heroic Hollywood | 'Dune' Film & Television Rights Acquired By Legendary Entertainment
Variety reports that Legendary has hired Eric Roth, the Academy Award winning writer of Forrest Gump, to pen the script for director Denis Villeneuve’s upcoming Dune reboot.

Legendary acquired the film and television rights to Frank Hebert’s classic science fiction novel late last year with Arrival director Denis Villeneuve officially signing on to helm a feature film reboot in February, 2017. Villeneuve has described the reboot as a dream project.

Dune was adapted into a feature film in 1984 by director David Lynch, receiving mixed reviews but becoming a cult favorite. In 2000, the novel was later adapted as a miniseries on the Sci-Fi channel.

A synopsis of Dune reads as follows:

Set in the distant future, Dune tells the story of Paul Atreides whose family accepts control of the desert planet Arrakis. As the only producer of a highly valuable resource, control of Arrakis is highly contested among the noble families. After Paul and his family are betrayed, the story explores themes of politics, religion, and man’s relationship to nature as Paul leads a rebellion to restore his family’s control of Arrakis.

Roth’s previous credits include the Academy Award nominated films The Curious Case of Benjamin Button and Munich.

No release date for the Dune reboot has been announced, though Villeneuve has confirmed that the film will be his next project after Blade Runner 2049.

Source: Variety

10 Book-To-Film Adaptations That Succeeded (And 15 That Failed)

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Adaptations
As tomorrow’s big Netflix release, the second go-around at adapting A Series of Unfortunate Events, proves, adaptations of beloved source material are not easy to make.

Books and film, like all arts, have a special relationship. The turn of the century saw a massive increase in adaptations of epic fantasy and science-fiction, particularly for the coveted youth market, thanks mostly to two big franchises – Harry Potter and The Lord of the Rings. Both legitimized fantasy as big-budget spectacle and prestige entertainment, when done with care. Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery and the years since are littered with attempts at replicating the magic of those films, including the original Unfortunate Events movie, which is first up on our list (as an ambitious-but-flawed failure).

Now, in the age of Peak TV, adapting these massive sagas are possible on television too. The Walking Dead and Game of Thrones both kicked open doors to imitators in the same ways Potter and Rings did, in terms of scope and budget. Shows like MTV’s Shannara and Hulu’s upcoming The Handmaid’s Tale, both based on famous books, draw directly from this trend. It’s also given second life to properties that didn’t work as features, such as Unfortunate Events.

For this article, I focused on the biggest in YA and children’s literature, in honor of Unfortunate Events return to screens (I’ll be recapping a “book” aka two episodes a day starting tomorrow morning!), while focusing on the criteria to rank them by. When it comes to judging these stories – some classics, some decidedly not – I kept in mind whether the films a) received a sequel b) made money at the box-office and c) were critically acclaimed.

  • Honorary success mentions: Matilda, James and the Giant Peach, Stardust, The Spiderwick Chronicles, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children
  • Honorary failure mentions: Bridge to TerabithiaCharlotte’s Web, The Host

Click Next to scroll through all the failures and successes.

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Sebastian Peris

Sebastian Peris

Canadian film buff, political junkie, comic book geek and board game enthusiast.