Kit Harington Discusses What’s Next On ‘Game Of Thrones’

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HBO’s Game of Thrones is known for having incredible characters, battle sequences that rival that of cinematic classics and death at every turn. With only two seasons of the popular show left, fans are wondering which characters will make it to the end and who will be sitting on the Iron Throne when everything concludes.

If previous seasons are any indications, the final two seasons will be intense, dramatic and heartbreaking.

Kit Harington, who plays Jon Snow, opened up about his experiences on season six and that looking ahead the show is going to get “very dark before it gets better.”

“It’s important to stress at this point that I haven’t had any scripts, so this is all guess work for me. I think it’s going to get very bleak before if there is a happy ending. If there’s any sort of win or heroic moment for Jon and everyone else. I think it’s going to get very dark before it gets better. I think what we might see this season is those White Walkers and that Army of the Dead really come into force. So that’s going to be exciting to see. I don’t know what it means. I think with the whole “winter is finally here” business, it means everyone is going to have a really bad time.”

Harington also addressed what the show means to him and how he is feeling about the impending end of Thrones.

“It has been in my consciousness a lot. This mammoth, goliath event in my life, which has so much of what my 20s are, is going to come to an end. I think I’m going to really make the effort in these next two years to enjoy every moment of it, because I don’t know when I’ll get something like this coming around again.”

Are you looking forward to the next season of Game of Thrones? Who do you think will “win the great game” at the end of the series? Let us know in the comments down below!

HBO’s Game of Thrones will return Summer 2017.

Source: The Hollywood Reporter 

Chelsea Lewis

Chelsea Lewis

Chelsea Lewis, TV division, joined Heroic Hollywood in 2016. Prior to joining the team at Heroic, she worked for TheCelebrityCafe.com covering everything from music to...

  • batghost

    People who still wonder “who will sit on the Iron Throne?” at the end of the series, are missing the whole point of this story.

    • John Smith

      OK, I’ll ask, according to you, what is the “whole point of the story”?

      • batghost

        Well, I’m not going to try and predict the end of the story, because no one knows that besides GRR Martin and the showrunners. BUT, its pretty obvious to anyone who has watched the show or read the books that the Iron Throne is a red herring, a macguffin if you will. It’s not really all that important in the grand scheme of the Long Night and the Battle for the Dawn. Only the first book was called “game of thrones” – and yes, the fight for the Iron Throne set things in motion, but ultimately wont be an integral part or the main focus of the true ending. I dont even think there will still be an Iron Throne by the conclusion.

        • John Smith

          Ok, great, but you still didn’t really say what you think the whole point of the story is. Or did you kind of misspeak before?

          As far as the Iron Throne goes, I can pretty much guarantee it exists at the end of the series. The throne is said to cut and injure those who sit on it, it is a literal and figurative sword of Damocles.

          • batghost

            no, i didn’t misspeak. You don’t need to get a snarky attitude man. What I clearly meant is that the focus of who is sitting on the Iron Throne at the end of the series is not necessarily pointless, but has already kind of served its purpose in the story. To set up all the players, to get them where they need to be. Whether Jon, Daenarys, Cersei or even Littlefinger ends up on the throne is not the point. The books and the show clearly show that who sits on the throne is of little importance. The real power players realize this and several characters have more or less stated such. The “point” of the story I suppose is subjective and will vary from person to person and even from character’s perspective within the books/show – but I think the whole point of the story is to show how there is no black and white. Every person has some degree of both good and evil within them. The villian is the hero of the other side. Also, that death will always be inevitable (which is physically represented by the White Walkers/Others coming for everyone) I don’t want to assume anything and say that you haven’t read the books because I don’t know if you have or not, but in the books it is pretty obvious that the Iron Throne isn’t important, but it is crucial that it APPEARS to be important. That’s all I was trying to say. I could write a whole research paper about the different underlying themes within this story, but I honestly dont care enough about you to provide every example and every thought that I have because it would take forever. Anyway – if you can expect anything from George RR Martin it is that the typical hero tropes we have seen throughout literature will be flipped on themselves. There is no ending where someone sits upon the Iron Throne and the world lives happily ever after.

          • John Smith

            “You don’t need to get a snarky attitude man. ”
            You started with with a snarky post, don’t be a hypocrite. I asked you a question, you didn’t answer it, so I repeated it. I like asking twice less than you like being asked twice.

            “are missing the whole point of this story.”
            ” The “point” of the story I suppose is subjective”
            If the point is subjective, who are you say if they’re wondering about the throne at the end then they’ve missed it?

            Also, the sword of Damocles isn’t a hero trope. The throne is a metaphor, it represents the danger those in power face. The throne is going to be there at the end, of that you can be certain.

          • batghost

            nothing about my initial post was snarky. you’re the one who was insistent that I “tell you the point of the story.” I’ve wasted enough time replying to a 2 day old post. If you dont get it man, you dont get it. Your Sword of Damocles idea/reference is also very wrong.

            Cheers.

          • John Smith

            The Iron throne is literally a collection of swords.
            Everyone that has sat upon it has died.

            If you don’t think the Iron Throne is a Sword of Damocles reference, then you don’t understand what the Sword of Damocles means.

          • batghost

            Yeah, a reference any 4th grader who just read his first book on Greek mythology could make. It’s so literal and obvious that it is wrong. And still, has nothing to do with the Battle for the Dawn, which is of much more importance than the Iron Throne. You are just falling for the red herring as GRRM likes to do to people. It’s cool man. Think what you want. Later

          • John Smith

            Damocles praised Dionysus’ wealth, then they switched for a day, then Damocles saw the sword. Damocles sees the sword during a banquet, he leaves the banquet understanding the peril those in power live under.

            It’s a reference “any 4th grader” could make because that is what it means. If you’re going to try and be condescending, at least be right about something at some point.

          • batghost

            LOL. I know the story. I know the order in which things happen. Never mentioned anything was learned in the beginning, I even specifically said “it’s only after” (not sure where you pulled that from, but i take it your reading comprehension could use some improving.) You just stated what I had already mentioned is the BIGGEST misconception of this tale. The reason I brought up the “4th Grader” is because I specifically remember reading this in 4th grade. You are acting like this is some sort of highly advanced reading. HA. Its a simple analogy often confused by a lot of people, yourself included (obviously).

            “The anecdote is often told as a reminder that for a powerful man, there’s always danger, although the real point of the story is that happiness is fragile.”

            Using the real moral of the story, it totally applies to the fact that the Iron Throne is NOT what you think it is. And GRRM is smart enough to use common misconceptions to lure the reader down a path that will ultimately get turned upside down on itself. I’m paraphrasing, but Dany mentions how “all she dreamed about was going home and taking the throne” but Tyrion telling her to “wish for something else” applies more to my point then your misreading of “great power comes with great danger.” Although that is true (those in power are usually in danger) that is not the moral you should be taking from the Sword of Damocles. Listen man, this will be my last post about this because I am not going to convince you, think what you want. ASOIAF and GoT are rad. I love it. Watch/read and enjoy. I never thought my little comment would develop into the most common misunderstanding of an ancient Greek parable.

          • John Smith

            Sigh… you used a lot of words to say nothing.
            While the moral of the story is all good and great, the moral of the story is irrelevant, as we’re discussing the sword. You remember that thing I said the throne represents which is actually a metaphor. There’s that pesky reading comprehension subject you keep trying to suggest is of such paramount importance, perhaps you should keep that in mind.

          • batghost

            Get a life, dweeb

          • John Smith

            Thanks but I’ve got one. Perhaps if you put down those books you take so much pride in reading, and stop being such an adversarial a-hat, you might just develop one yourself.

          • batghost

            Also, just so you know. The Sword of Damocles story is not about “those in power are always in great danger.” That is the most common misinterpretation of that parable. What it actually means is that those who think their “rulers, kings, etc” have true power are mistaken. It’s a ruse (just like the Iron Thone). It’s only after Damocles praises Dionysus for his wealth and power that he learns the true lesson. Power is fragile and not at all what he thought it was. So in actuality, the Sword of Damocles is probably a better analogy to back up my point, other than the one you are trying to make. Although it still doesn’t work. Nice try though. Laterzzzz