‘Rogue One’ Screenwriter Explains Connections To ‘A New Hope’

'Rogue One: A Star Wars Story' screenwriter Gary Whitta explains the connections to 'Star Wars: A New Hope' and parallels with Jyn Erso and Luke Skywalker.

The new batch of Star Wars films, from Rogue One: A Star Wars Story to the upcoming Han Solo movie all connect to the original trilogy in many ways.

With Rogue One, that connection is immediate. In an interview with ComicBook.com, the film’s screenwriter, Gary Whitta, discussed how A New Hope influenced Rogue One.

John [Knoll] always had from the very beginning the idea that Jyn, her parents had been killed by the Empire, and that’s why she fought against the Empire, because she was kind of driven by revenge, this hatred of the Empire, and then that kind of evolved as we went on.

We came up with the idea that her father wasn’t killed, but he was kind of abducted by the Empire and forced to work on the Death Star, and that’s was kind of, I think, the big eureka moment for us when we figured out the idea that the father should be the scientist who kind of reluctantly helped the Empire build the Death Star, but was determined in someway to find a way out, to kind of undo the terrible wrong that he’d been forced to commit.

Whitta went on to explain how this influence also created a parallel between Jyn Erso and Luke Skywalker’s stories.

So designing the flaw into the Death Star and then getting that information to his daughter, and in the same way that in the original Star Wars films, you know, Luke is trying to kind of redeem his father. I feel that in our film, in much in the same way Jyn’s trying to redeem hers, by completing the job that he started. By putting that fatal flaw in the Death Star and then trying to get the plans to the Rebellion so they can exploit it.

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story is available on DVD and Blu-ray on April 4.

Source: ComicBook.com

Mae Abdulbaki

Mae Abdulbaki

Mae Abdulbaki is an entertainment journalist and Weekend Editor at Heroic Hollywood. She's a geek, a lover of words, superheroes, and all things entertainment.