‘Willy Wonka’ Origin Movie Eyes ‘Paddington’ Director Paul King

Willy Wonka Oompa LoompasBefore Charlie Bucket got a golden ticket to a world of pure imagination, Willy Wonka began a corporate empire of innovative candies that took the world by storm. To tell that story, Warner Brothers are looking to enlist the director of Paddington and its sequel, Paul King, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

WB has been rumored to be interested in making a Willy Wonka prequel since at least 2017, with Ryan Gosling rumored to be interested in the title role. Regardless of whoever gets to wear the top hat, however, King and producer David Heyman are apparently in negotiations to take what they’ve learned from two Paddington movies and apply it to the world that Roald Dahl’s most famous character. The script, currently kept under wraps, is written by Simon Rich.

Little is known about the plot of the Willy Wonka reimagining, but THR seems to be under the impression that at least part of it will be based in Loompaland, a mysterious far-off, jungle-covered island where Wonka discovers and recruits the Oompa-Loompa people while searching for new ingredients to craft his candy from. Given that the movie is suggested to be an adventure film, this would only make sense, as Wonka’s workers are perhaps one of the most memorable aspects of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory aside from the eccentric candy-maker himself.

Willy Wonka does not currently have a release date.

Source: The Hollywood Reporter

10 Book-To-Film Adaptations That Succeeded (And 15 That Failed)

Previous1 of 26

Adaptations
As tomorrow’s big Netflix release, the second go-around at adapting A Series of Unfortunate Events, proves, adaptations of beloved source material are not easy to make.

Books and film, like all arts, have a special relationship. The turn of the century saw a massive increase in adaptations of epic fantasy and science-fiction, particularly for the coveted youth market, thanks mostly to two big franchises – Harry Potter and The Lord of the Rings. Both legitimized fantasy as big-budget spectacle and prestige entertainment, when done with care. Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery and the years since are littered with attempts at replicating the magic of those films, including the original Unfortunate Events movie, which is first up on our list (as an ambitious-but-flawed failure).

Now, in the age of Peak TV, adapting these massive sagas are possible on television too. The Walking Dead and Game of Thrones both kicked open doors to imitators in the same ways Potter and Rings did, in terms of scope and budget. Shows like MTV’s Shannara and Hulu’s upcoming The Handmaid’s Tale, both based on famous books, draw directly from this trend. It’s also given second life to properties that didn’t work as features, such as Unfortunate Events.

For this article, I focused on the biggest in YA and children’s literature, in honor of Unfortunate Events return to screens (I’ll be recapping a “book” aka two episodes a day starting tomorrow morning!), while focusing on the criteria to rank them by. When it comes to judging these stories – some classics, some decidedly not – I kept in mind whether the films a) received a sequel b) made money at the box-office and c) were critically acclaimed.

  • Honorary success mentions: Matilda, James and the Giant Peach, Stardust, The Spiderwick Chronicles, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children
  • Honorary failure mentions: Bridge to TerabithiaCharlotte’s Web, The Host

Click Next to scroll through all the failures and successes.

Previous1 of 26

Grant Davis

Grant Davis

A Texan freelance writer with interests in Star Wars, superhero movies, and entertainment in general.