Zack Snyder Explains Batman’s Vision; Hints At The Anti-Life Equation

imageWarning Possible Spoilers Ahead

Batman v Superman did quite a lot of world building for the DC Extended Universe. Numerous cameos, Easter eggs and Batman’s horrific vision of the future shows us the possible future of of the DC Films slate. Batman’s Mad Max-Esque vision shows us an apocalyptic future where Superman is evil, Parademons run rampant and Darkseid’s Omega Symbol is branded in the dirt.

Immediately after Bruce Wayne has this vision, he’s blinded by The Flash coming out of the Speed Force in a specialized suit, warning him of that possible future he just witnessed. While speaking with Empire Magazine Zack Snyder cryptically explained the dessert dream sequence:

I think it’s okay to look at the extended dream sequence as an impressionistic view of a possible future, that’s… in the sequence, so I’m not like spoiling anything or making up anything that you didn’t see. So the connection with the Flash… part of that sequence, you can speculate if, whether or not Flash is coming from that reality or another one, but that’s the fun stuff to try and figure out exactly what Flash is saying to Bruce and what he means… we know, so… we’re not making it up.

Snyder then goes on to elaborate on Darkseid’s “imprint” throughout the vision:

Oh, that giant impression in the ground? Oh yeah, that’s right. I mean, maybe Darkseid exists out in the universe somewhere, just looking for something, something that’s against life, I don’t know.

Does Zack’s statements clear things up for you? Or are you still lost and wish they had explained it more in the film? Sound off in the comments section.

Fearing the actions of a god-like Super Hero left unchecked, Gotham City’s own formidable, forceful vigilante takes on Metropolis’s most revered, modern-day savior, while the world wrestles with what sort of hero it really needs. And with Batman and Superman at war with one another, a new threat quickly arises, putting mankind in greater danger than it’s ever known before.

Directed by Zack Snyder Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice stars Ben Affleck as Batman, Henry Cavill as Superman, Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman, Amy Adams as Lois Lane, Jeremy Irons as Aflred Pennyworth and Jess Eisenberg as Lex Luthor. Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice is in theaters now.

Nathaniel Brail

Nathaniel Brail

Genius, Playboy, Billionaire, Philanthropist, Deputy. Follow me on Twitter and Instagram @NateBrail

  • Jeff Forehand

    I’ve never seen a film where the director has to explain so many of his decisions the week following its release. Then again, if it were good storytelling to begin with, it wouldn’t need to be explained.

    • unpaidpundit

      “BvS” is the one chapter in an ongoing story. If Batman had an unexplained vision in a comic, you would expect the vision to be explained in a later comic. Stuff like that happens in comics all the time. I expect that the reason for Batman’s vision will be explained in a later film.

      • Math

        That scene felt like a post credit scene but in the middle of the film.

        That’s kind of the main problem with this movie. Maybe we’ll look back in a few years and this movie will have been a brilliant piece in a bigger puzzle that will all make sense once we see all the other movies. Right now, it’s just confusing for the casual viewers and looks like an incomplete mess. Time will tell.

        • SAMURAI36

          That scene felt like a post credit scene but in the middle of the film.

          In other words, it’s kinda like Marvel, but not exactly, which makes it bad.

          • Math

            Maybe it’s not a bad thing that they try a different approach. I personally loved the movie a lot. I just feel that there are a lot of important pieces that are missing. I know enough about DC to follow what’s going on, and kind of fill in the blanks, but for more casual viewers, i can see how they can get confused and call this movie a mess. My impression is that the WB execs forced Snyder to change a lot of things and that’s what created huge holes in this movie. My feeling is that the ultimate cut will be a much more coherent movie and other DC movies will help fill in the rest of the blanks and we will eventually look back on this movie as being a much better movie then how a lot of people perceive it now. They are doing the reverse formula that Marvel did. Marvel slowly gave audiences little pieces and slowly built to a bigger world. DC is sending us everything at once and that’s a lot to digest. With time, as all the pieces fall into place, this movie will make more sense. As long as WB doesn’t panic and try to “change the tone” of everything, that they trust in the people they hired and allow them to stick to their vision, I think there’s a lot of potential. That’s what I believe.

          • SAMURAI36

            The problem is, folks are making alot of assumptions about what the general audience could or could not figure out on their own. People really need to give other people alot more credit than what they do.

            I have yet to hear anyone who didn’t enjoy the film say “what’s with all the weird dream scenes? This movie is terrible!!” And there were clearly casual viewers who enjoyed the film too.

            As the other guy said, there’s no reason to look for any of these dream scenes to be answered or explained in this film. I’d wager that 90% of the audience (general as well as hardcore DC fans) knew that this movie was setting up a larger universe, hence the “Dawn of Justice” subtitle.

          • Math

            Yeah I agree. I think that part is pretty clear that it’s setting up the sequels/spinoffs whatever you want to call them. Like I said, certain scenes felt cut short and clearly there’s more story linked to those threads. Certain decisions felt out of character, but I can go along with it. I personally really didn’t mind all these things, but I understand why some people did, and my feelings are that once they see the bigger picture, they will be less bothered by these issues they currently have. Some will always hate, that’s unavoidable, but I’m sure it’s going to be one of these movies that gets more respect with time. That’s what I think.

      • SAMURAI36

        OMG, precisely this. I dunno why people are acting like none of this has happened before. It’s really not that difficult, especially considering all the liberties that Marvel takes with this stuff in their films.

    • Joe Chaisson

      Batman storyline should have focused on his detective work on figuring out how to beat Superman. His motivation is his need to protect the innocence. He views Superman’s action in MoS as careless and a massive threat.
      Superman is trying to make up for his action in MoS and the loss of innocent life.

      Superman fighting Batman under stands the weight Batman feels so he s on the defensive. During a 40 minute epic fight they learn a lot about each other. Superman learns about Batman biggest fail the loss of Jason Todd AND THE MOVIE SHOWS THIS.

      In the end they find out they are similar, Lex has been watching Batman and learns him self how to beat Superman

    • Math

      I was thinking the exact same thing. Well said.

    • I never needed explaining… In fact I was saying all this stuff and clearly seeing the Crisis/Injustice links and comic stuff to my friends immediately after the movie. Just cuz it’s confusing to people who aren’t fans of the source material doesn’t make it bad storytelling. I don’t like films that are spelled out like I’m an idiot. This film treats fans like they’re smart and rewards them with Easter eggs the casual moviegoer has to ask us about.

      • Axxell

        Not knowing something doesn’t mean you aren’t smart. It just means you haven’t been informed, which in this case is the job of the director. You shouldn’t need to have read the comics to understand the movie.

        • SAMURAI36

          As someone who is a fan of the MCU, you sound like a hypocrite for not expecting some things to be told over the course of the next few films.

          So, Marvel can set up their Cinematic Universe, but DC can’t?

          • Axxell

            DC absolutely SHOULD set up their cinematic universe. But one thing is to hint towards a larger plot in further movies, and quite another to leave stuff out that’s crucial to the development of the current story. Don’t conflate 2 different things.

          • SAMURAI36

            So tell me, how is Darkseid and the New Gods crucial to BVS, exactly?

            And why are you even here talking about this? If DC is so terrible, why did you even pay money to see this film?

          • Axxell

            First off, if the theory that Darkseid was controlling Luthor’s actions is true, then yeah, that’s a crucial role, and the movie should’ve made that clear, or at least indicated that someone was controlling him. Otherwise the audience can only surmise that Jesse Eisenberg was playing a mentally handicapped villain, or was just horrible acting.

            Second, I didn’t pay to see the movie; I got a free ticket from a friend of mine who wanted to check it out, so I went with them. BTW, never said DC was terrible.

          • SAMURAI36

            First off, if the theory that Darkseid was controlling Luthor’s actions is true, then yeah, that’s a crucial role, and the movie should’ve made that clear, or at least indicated that someone was controlling him.

            That is one of THE stupidest theories I’ve ever heard.

            Otherwise the audience can only surmise that Jesse Eisenberg was playing a mentally handicapped villain, or was just horrible acting.

            Ahh, so now Jesse is guilty of terrible acting. And you wonder why no one here takes you seriously.

            Second, I didn’t pay to see the movie; I got a free ticket from a friend of mine who wanted to check it out, so I went with them. BTW, never said DC was terrible.

            So, you spend someone else’s money on the film?

            And you’ve been cheerleading for Marvel for the better part of a year now, and have had nothing positive to say about DC. So your actions say everything.

          • Axxell

            That is one of THE stupidest theories I’ve ever heard.

            Yes. And that is sad, because that’s the only logical explanation for Lex Luthor going Charles Manson at the end of the film.

            Ahh, so now Jesse is guilty of terrible acting. And you wonder why no one here takes you seriously.

            I didn’t say it was poor acting, but thanks for confirming you can’t read.

            So, you spend someone else’s money on the film?

            It’s called “gifting”…happens when people respect you, something that’s obviously foreign to your lone illiterate mind.

      • SAMURAI36

        Precisely this.

  • w0undedmagic

    I don’t understand the “Knightmare” backlash. It is SUPPOSED to be vague and “confusing”-like a dream/premonition. You’re not SUPPOSED to know that The Flash has traveled through time-or that it’s even The Flash. All the [casual non-comic fan] audience needs to know is the information given to them. In the age of “cinematic universes” and post-credits scenes, the BvS filmmakers trusted the audience to understand that this sequence was meant to paint a bigger picture of where these characters *could* be heading in future films-and apparently, the audience failed them.
    Now, if you just don’t like the modern CONCEPT of “seeding” sequel plot lines in films-that’s a separate argument.

    • Triple M

      Are we not ” supposed ” to know whether Batman has suddenly become psychic, or whether he was having a dream within a dream?

      Because it looked like it made no sense, and was in fact just a ” seeding ” exercise that had no internal logic.

      • w0undedmagic

        Hmm, well don’t ever watch a David Lynch film-just stick to light and fluffy stuff that spells out everything without any ambiguity or forboding atmosphere.

        • Triple M

          I like David Lynch… are you seriously comparing this to David Lynch?

          • w0undedmagic

            Oh you do? Please, enlighten me on the “internal logic” of Inland Empire. Or, maybe you can explain the “internal logic” of the Black Lodge in Twin Peaks? Go on, tell me more about how the Lady in the Radiator MAKES SENSE in Eraserhead.

            You can’t.
            And that’s ok.

            However, apparently it’s NOT ok for a silly-willy Superhero movie to attempt such bold filmmaking choices-because they’re only supposed to be FUN, JOYFUL and filled with characters who ONLY make altruistic and politically correct decisions, right?

            Also, since you weren’t paying attention:
            “Are we not ” supposed ” to know whether Batman has suddenly become psychic, or whether he was having a dream within a dream?”

            Here’s the scene:
            -Bruce falls asleep at his computer desk.
            -Bruce wakes up in the KNIGHTMARE
            -blah blah Superman captures him and “kills” him-
            -Bruce awakens in front of his computer to The Flash giving him a message/warning about the future-PAPERS ARE BLOWING AROUND EVERYWHERE (from the time portal-thing)
            -Flash disappears, Bruce wakes up AGAIN
            -When he awakes, confused-what do WE see?
            -WE SEE PAPERS BLOWING AROUND IN THE BACKGROUND.

            THERE’S YOUR ANSWER. PAY ATTENTION NEXT TIME.

          • Triple M

            BvS was not a David Lynch movie. It was a mess.

            Yes Batman falls asleep, and has a dream, where he sees things that would seem to be premonitions, since we all know parademons are coming in Justice League. But Batman isn’t psychic, so how does that work?
            Then he wakes up, and sees the Flash, except he wasn’t awake he was still dreaming. So was the Flash actually there or was Batman dreaming again?

            Makes zero sense.

            Twin Peaks was filled with imagery and story lines that weren’t supposed to make that sort of sense, right from the very start. That was the sort of film it was ( or tv show ) . BvS wasn’t . Besides, any character in Twin Peaks could’ve been psychic, absolutely anything would’ve fit into that show. In this case Batman is firmly established and having future visions is not something he does…ever.

            So… no.
            Nothing like a David Lynch movie at all.
            Nice try though.

          • w0undedmagic

            Yea, you COMPLETELY missed the point. Not surprising. I never said BvS was “like” a David Lynch film. Again, not surprised it went over your head. Not worth trying to explain again. Enjoy the new Kevin Hart movie!

          • Triple M

            You never said much of anything at all in fact

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